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Williams College Kellogg House

Williamstown, Massachusetts

The Kellogg House Addition project adapts a historically recognized on-campus building to support program needs of both the Environmental Studies Department and the Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives. The integration of these programs creates a place where students, faculty and the Williamstown community can work and learn sustainable living. The project is striving to meet the ambitious goals and objectives of the Living Building Challenge Program which among other requirements includes: Thirty percent of the Kellogg House’s project site should support food production at a scale and density appropriate to the site.  One hundred percent of stormwater will be managed on-site to feed the project’s internal demands as well as downstream ecosystems demands at a controlled acceptable release rate for recharging groundwater and surface waters. One hundered percent of project water needs must be met by harvesting onsite rainwater.  The Kelloogg House project aims to create a walkable, pedestrian-oriented community that encourages a car free lifestyle.  For every hectacre of development, an equal amount of land away from the project must be set aside in perpetuity as a part of a habitat exchange.

Architect 
Black River Design Architects